Landlord's right

Discussion in 'Landlord & Rental Property Questions' started by Corzhens, Dec 4, 2015.

  1. Corzhens

    Corzhens Senior Investor

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    Tenant's rights is what we always see. It seems that the law is biased on the side of the tenant. But a landlord has some rights too and one of it is the use of his property. A landlord here can evict a tenant for the purpose of using his property. Like if he has a child who needed to rent, why rent somewhere else when his parents own an apartment? So the tenant of the apartment has to go in favor of the landlord's child.

    Any more rights of the landlord?
     
  2. Sweetymae

    Sweetymae Member

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    Landlords have many rights, including the rights to choose who will live in their rental properties; set lease terms (such as the amount of rent, pet policy, and number of occupants allowed per rental unit); furnish rental units as they like; and evict tenants who cause problems (such as damaging rental property or not paying rent). These rights are not unlimited, however. To avoid costly legal disputes and confusion with tenants, it’s crucial that landlords understand their legal responsibilities (typically under state law) that set limits on their rights by requiring landlords to comply some rules and regulations in the property.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 8, 2016
  3. crimsonghost747

    crimsonghost747 Senior Investor

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    Lots of rights of course, you are the owner afterall. But yeah you are right, in most cases it feels like the law is biased. I'm mainly worried about having tenants that take ages to evict, destroy the property etc. It's often hard to make those things go away since the law is so favourable to tenants (at least here it is)... I've seen it first hand when it takes more than 2 months to evict someone who isn't even paying his rent!
     
  4. Corzhens

    Corzhens Senior Investor

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    There are not a few celebrated cases here where the tenant got back at the landlord for attempted eviction. The tenant fought tooth and nail by suing the landlord. The case landed in court and after a year of litigation, the landlord is absolved and the tenant was to pay the landlord the amount of money being contested. It's not much of the money but the trauma of the case in court.
     
  5. L_B

    L_B Well-Known Member

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    Around here I find that it always seems to work in favor of the landlords and not the tenants. They always seem to side with the landlord and just like tenants, not all landlords are honest and trustworthy. It goes both ways.
     
  6. kgord

    kgord Senior Investor

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    I think it all goes back to the contract. I think having an ironclad contract in the first place will go to alleviating a lot of problems between landlords and tenants. It is just one of the things that you should make sure you have in place when you are either contemplating renting, from someone else or are renting property to others.
     
  7. Troponin

    Troponin Guest

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    In most cases, this is what we see here too. We had a rental property for a short period of time, but our tenants were pretty good people. If I really wanted to, I could show up any time I wanted and see the property. In some states, the landlord can just walk right in. Here in Texas, that would be a fatal mistake though, so you won't see it much here. Hell, we had a no-knock warrant being served down here, a deputy was shot and killed, and the guy was acquitted because his girlfriend was pregnant and he was protecting her. No-knock warrants took a big dive since that case was closed.

    Regardless, landlords have some pretty good rights, but it changes from state to state.
     
  8. Corzhens

    Corzhens Senior Investor

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    Pardon me but I think the so called RIGHT or RIGHTS is what's causing the problem. It is the factor that creates arrogance on the part of one party. Like the tenant's right, it fortifies the stand of tenants that sometimes there are tenants who act like they own the property. In the same vein, some landlords treat their tenants like slaves who can be kicked out when they don't follow the rules.
     
  9. Lynk

    Lynk Member

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    As a renter, I would be appalled if I were kicked out of a property I had been paying on time and maintaining well so that they could rent to a family member, if I weren't given a reasonable amount of notice. I would think that the lease should cover this sort of matter in most cases, doesn't it? Can you break a lease to use your property? Here there is a minimum amount of notice required to evict no matter the reason.
     
  10. Corzhens

    Corzhens Senior Investor

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    I'm sorry but that is under the law and most lease contracts have that as fine print - you can be ejected if the place is to be used by the immediate family member. However, the ejection period is 2 months. On the part of the tenant, there is a recourse in the barangay, the community government that usually mediates in those cases between tenant and landlord. But I understand your sentiment of being kicked out of the premises when you are being a good tenant. We were also tenants before when we had rented an apartment for 2 years and a house for 5 years.
     

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